Artichoke & Garlic Hummus

In six short weeks, life will be turned upside down for my husband, Les, and me. This is when our kitchen tear-out will begin, and we are beginning to shift our expectations as we prepare for the eight weeks or so that we will be “without” a kitchen. Welcome, friends, to our “in-between” kitchen!


We have rearranged our dining room space to accommodate a baker’s rack that will hold some of the appliances that will help us get through the chaos. A new two-burner induction cooktop will allow us to do simple stove-top cooking, including heating water for my daily dose of French press coffee. We will make good use of our slow cooker, toaster oven and the panini griddle that doubles as a waffle iron. We have the gas grill for outdoor cooking, and so far, the only thing I haven’t quite figured out is how I will make bread without our oven, though don’t be surprised if I use one or more of the above to make it happen!

As we are preparing for the load out of the old kitchen (not to mention a bevy of random pantry and freezer ingredients), I’m giving all of our other small electrics a chance to prove themselves worthy of a spot in our new space. One item that will be (sadly) getting the boot is our KitchenAid 11-cup food processor, but not because we don’t use it; on the contrary, this thing gets so much action, it is on its last legs. The protective film over the power buttons has become brittle and is completely worn away from the pulse button, the feed chute is cracked and the inside of the “S” blade stem has some dried-on crud that I have not been able to remove. I have had the appliance nearly 20 years, and KitchenAid no longer makes my model (or any of the parts), so my only choice will be to replace the machine.


Until then, I’ll keep going with recipes like this one, for easy homemade hummus made with garbanzo beans, lemony artichoke hearts and lots of fresh garlic. Hummus is one of my favorite “blank canvas” foods, and it’s so simple at home, it makes no sense to buy it. The other key ingredients include tahini, olive oil and a squeeze of fresh lemon, which is a perfect highlight to the tangy artichoke. 

Warm the garbanzo beans to soften them up before you begin and use a food processor or a good blender for best, smoothest results. Enjoy your hummus on crackers, chips, crostini or fresh veggie slices.


It’s so much tastier than store-bought!

Ingredients

15 oz. can garbanzo beans, with liquid

3 Tbsp. tahini* (see notes)

2 to 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped

About 1/2 cup marinated artichoke hearts*, drained and rough-chopped

Juice of 1/2 lemon

Kosher salt and pepper

3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil


*Notes

Tahini is a paste made of ground sesame seeds. It is available in most larger supermarkets, usually in the same section as olives, or perhaps in the international aisle.

The artichoke hearts I used were Trader Joe’s, marinated in sunflower oil, vinegar and spices. If you use plain hearts, consider adding a pinch or dried herbs (dill or oregano would be great), and either way, drain all the excess liquid from them.


Instructions


Pour the entire contents of the canned garbanzo beans into a small saucepan. Heat over medium-low heat until mixture just begins to boil. Remove from heat and drain liquid off beans, but do not discard it (you’ll use it for blending).

Transfer warm beans into a food processor or blender and pulse a few times to grind the beans into a meal-like texture. Scrape down sides of the processor bowl. Add tahini, garlic, artichoke hearts, salt and pepper. Pulse a few times to combine. Scrape down the sides again.

Turn processor on and run continuously while slowly pouring about 3 tablespoons of the warm liquid into the processor. Blending slowly will help to emulsify the ingredients into a smooth blend. Add more or less of the liquid, depending on your preference for hummus consistency. Remember that the mixture will become firmer after chilling. Scrape down sides once more.

Run processor continuously and slowly blend in about 3 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil.

Transfer hummus to a bowl and refrigerate, covered, for up to a week.



Artichoke & Garlic Hummus

11 thoughts on “Artichoke & Garlic Hummus

  1. Pingback: “Chopped” Challenge (Episode No. 5 – “A pinsa this, a pinsa that”) | Comfort du Jour

  2. What a nice “memorial” to the Kitchen Aid and the old kitchen 🙂 It is sometimes so hard to let go of old appliances, even the ones you just gotta have and only use once (just like my closet).

    That hummus looks yummy! I haven’t made that in a while and it is something that I can eat 🙂 Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hummus is a favorite in my house but I’ve never tried making it. I will do so now.
    I’m watching your kitchen reno plans very closely. I’m planning and dreading to do the same but have been holding off. I like your idea of getting a portable induction stove. It’s been duly noted!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for your visit and comment, Sandy! Once you start making hummus at home, you may find that you never want it store-bought again. It is completely customizable to your preference for texture, flavor, salt, etc.

      I’m glad the remodel plans we are sharing are helpful to others. As we get closer, I’ll describe some of the other things we hope will ease us through the awkward weeks without a kitchen. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Since artichokes and lemons are my favorite flavorings, I will definitely be making this. I have a Cuisinart 11 cup and I really like it. It is very light, which is very important because of my arthritis, but it has a nice powerful motor.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I hope you enjoy the hummus, Bernadette! And thank you for the tip on the Cuisinart. That is one of the machines I am looking at as a possible replacement for my KitchenAid. A powerful motor is a must!

      Like

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