Baked Salmon with Creamy Dijon Sauce

What a week! Things have been a bit upside-down at our house, as my husband and I are now in week five of our master bath remodel. It isn’t clear to me how a room half the size of the kitchen can take longer to overhaul, but we are assured that the end of the month will bring light at the end of the tunnel. I’m sure ready to get back to normal, though “normal” itself is different with the change of season. Can I get an “achoo?”


The weather is warming, my car is predictably covered in yellow pollen, all the flowers are blooming and the bees are buzzing (literally). Yesterday, as I chatted with a neighbor in the warmth of the afternoon, we heard a humming sound that became increasingly loud as we talked. It was not the sound of the nearby wet saw grinding away at the large porcelain tiles that will grace the walls of our new, walk-in shower—no, this sound was much closer and sounded like a chaotic symphony of the natural sort. To be honest, it felt and sounded a bit ominous, as if the wind carried a warning. I finally looked up to realize that an enormous swarm of bees was on the move! In all my years, I had never before witnessed such a sight, and it was something to behold. Thankfully, they kept moving!


Easter arrives this weekend, and for the occasion, I’ll be making a couple batches of homemade Moravian Sugar Cake this evening and tomorrow morning. And then, with the Friday evening arrival of Passover, all leavened baked goods will be “off the table” for a week (plus a day). That is a big test of my willpower, and I will probably try to satisfy my cravings virtually by sharing a previously made bread recipe (or two).

In the meantime, here’s a delicious and healthful seafood recipe that fits the bill for the final Friday of Lent or for a simple Passover meal for the coming week. When I made this dish a few months ago, it was a good reminder for me that a meal does not have to be complicated to seem elegant. The creamy Dijon-spiked sauce has a dual role; first, to coat the salmon during baking (which keeps it delightfully moist) and, second, a reserved amount can be dolloped onto the plate for dipping as you enjoy each bite. I like wild or sustainably farm-raised salmon for this recipe, but arctic char or steelhead trout would be equally delicious, and it only takes 30 minutes, start to finish—perfect at the end of a hectic “here comes spring” week!


Ingredients (serves 2)

2 fillets salmon (about 6 oz. each, skin-on is fine)

Creamy Dijon Sauce

1/3 cup sour cream (or Greek yogurt, if you prefer)

1 tsp. Dijon mustard* (see note below)

1 small shallot, finely chopped

2 tsp. fresh dill, finely chopped (or about 1/2 tsp. dried dill)

A small handful of fresh, flat-leaf parsley, chopped

Juice of 1/2 small lemon

Kosher salt and black pepper to taste


*Notes

If you will be making this dish for Passover, omit the Dijon, as mustard is not considered kosher for Passover, especially in Ashkenazi Jewish culture. I’m still learning the rules, and though we don’t follow all of them at our house, I would hate to lead someone else astray of acceptable standards. This will be delicious, even without the mustard.


Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350° F. Prepare a baking sheet, lined with parchment or silicone liner.
  2. Pat salmon fillets dry with paper towels. Season each with salt and pepper.
  3. Stir together the sour cream, Dijon, shallots, dill and parsley. Squeeze in lemon juice and stir to combine. Adjust salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Spread the creamy Dijon sauce generously over each fillet, reserving a few tablespoons for serving later. Bake for 25 minutes, or until salmon flakes easily.

Baked Salmon with Creamy Dijon Sauce
Served with easy sauteed spinach and roasted rings of delicata squash.

8 thoughts on “Baked Salmon with Creamy Dijon Sauce

    • Thanks, Mimi. And yes, get those squash seeds in the ground! I am going to try for a garden again this year; seems the hangry deer may have moved on from the woods behind us, and maybe I have a chance at fresh-grown produce this year. Fingers crossed!

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  1. This salmon looks tasty! The squash in the picture of the food made me text Jim to add some to my grocery list.😀

    Bees! Yikes! We get them here during the summer. I have to take down our hummingbird feeders when they get really bad. Hope they are gone 🥺

    Liked by 1 person

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