Garlic Mashed (Terrie’s favorite potatoes)

I can’t remember exactly when I ditched boxes of potato flakes and started making mashed potatoes the real way for Thanksgiving (and every other time I wanted mashed potatoes). But I can say the process has evolved over the years. As my wife, Terrie, creator of this blog often says, cooking is about being inspired, taking chances and elevating your dishes. Just as I continue to try new methods and ingredients on the first dish I ever successfully created (chili), I’ve tweaked these garlic mashed potatoes over the past 20 years. In fact, they didn’t even start out as garlic mashed!

When I was growing up, I would sometimes take the baked potatoes my mother made, scoop out the innards, add margarine (Parkay, to be specific) and mash. It seemed to make them more tolerable.

For the current version, I’ve upped the ante by adding real butter, roasted garlic, our grated parm-romano blend and heavy cream, none of which were in the early year versions of this dish. About a decade ago, I decided to experiment with the potato mix. I loved Yukon Gold and had a hunch doing a 50-50 mix of Yukon and russet would work well. I was right. The garlic mashed I’m serving up here is a silky blend of flavor that kind of melts in your mouth. I usually add more butter than what the recipe calls for. Just because, as Terrie and I say about certain recipes, “There’s too much butter (or parm-romano blend, bacon, bourbon, chocolate). Said nobody. Ever.”


Ingredients (makes 6-8 servings)

1 large garlic head, roasted

Extra virgin olive oil (or spray)

2-3 medium to large Russet potatoes

2-3 medium to large Yukon gold potatoes

4 Tbsp. (half stick) salted butter (with the option to add more)

4 oz. heavy cream (with the option to add more)

1/4 cup parm-romano blend (with the option to add more)

Salt and pepper to taste


Putting it together

Preheat oven to 350° F. Roast the head of garlic by cutting off the top, adding oil (olive oil preferred) either from a bottle or a spray can. Wrap tightly in foil and roast for about an hour. You can check out Terrie’s post from yesterday for more detail and step-by-step pictures, but it goes like this:

Peel and dice the potatoes and heat stove-top on high. As the water begins to boil, add salt and reduce heat to simmer. Cook until potatoes are soft enough to pierce with a fork. Drain potatoes and return to pot.

Add butter and heavy cream, add salt and pepper. Squeeze out the roasted garlic bulbs into the potatoes. Use a potato masher and mash by hand if you like. Or use a potato ricer if you like (before adding ingredients) for an even silkier texture. There was a time when I added the blend to a stand mixer, but I’ve since disavowed those years (the potatoes get too pasty).

As you mix, continue to taste, adding salt and pepper as needed, but also adding additional butter and/or cream if it feels too potato-ey. Add the grated cheese blend and continue to mash until it completely disappears into the mix, which won’t take long.

Serve with an additional pat of butter, gravy or your own preferred alternatives. Terrie is already eating it straight from the pot.

Now we have perfection.

Terrie’s note:

The blend of potatoes Les uses makes these so special because the Yukon golds are smooth and creamy, while the russets add a soft fluffiness. The roasted garlic and parm-romano add new levels of savory flavor. They are good for Thanksgiving, but we also make them as a side for more casual meals, such as meatloaf, steaks, pork chops and beer can roasted chicken. I confess that I’m always on the lookout for another new main dish that would be an excuse to make these again. Feel free to share your ideas in the comments section. 🙂

Want to make this recipe?


Roasted Garlic (a.k.a. best flavor ever)

Something magical happens to garlic when you wrap it in foil and put it in the oven. All the pungent, sharp spiciness fades like a bad memory as it becomes entirely different—creamy, mellow, warm and nutty.

In our kitchen, roasted garlic gets plenty of action, particularly at the holidays when we are making casseroles, gravies, appetizers and roast meats. If you are not roasting your own garlic, it’s a good time to start, especially in advance of many of the recipes I’ll be offering over the next week. You’ll save a lot of time and money over buying it pre-roasted, and I promise you this—you’ll never want to go back to any store-bought substitute. Roasting garlic is simple to do, and it doesn’t require any special equipment or gadgets.

Before I break it down into steps, let’s take a moment to explore the world of garlic to better understand more about it and how this roasting “magic” happens.

What gives raw garlic a sharp flavor?

Garlic belongs to the same botanical family (allium) as onions, leeks and chives. All of them contain organosulfur compounds (most notably allicin), which contribute to the strong aroma as well as the sharp, biting flavor. You may not know that the way you cut garlic can affect the flavor of it in a dish. When used in whole cloves, it is relatively mild. Slices are stronger, and chopped garlic really exaggerates the sharpness because of the release of the oils within the cloves.

How long has garlic been used in cooking?

A mighty long time! Food historians estimate that garlic had culinary uses in ancient China and Egypt as long as 4,000 years ago. There’s even a passage in the Bible to corroborate claims of garlic’s longstanding place in our diets. The verses are embedded in the Old Testament story of Moses trying his darnedest to lead the Israelites out of Egypt to the Promised Land. A group of complainers started grousing about the manna that God provided to them each day for nourishment along the way. All they could think about was how great everything “used to be.” (Hmm, such clamoring seems somehow familiar.)

The rabble with them began to crave other food, and again the Israelites started wailing and said, “If only we had meat to eat! We remember the fish we ate in Egypt at no cost—also the cucumbers, melons, leeks, onions and garlic. But now we have lost our appetite: we never see anything but this manna!”

Numbers 11:4-5, New International Version

Garlic’s prevalence eventually spread throughout the Asian and European continents and pretty much everywhere else, and I’d be hard-pressed to name a cuisine today that does not use garlic.

Is garlic good for you?

Maybe, but you should always check with your doctor before assuming that it’s safe to ingest garlic in large quantity or concentrated form. Anecdotes on the internet may suggest that chewing raw garlic does everything from preventing hangovers to curing cancer, but please be smart. There are mixed results from actual medical research, and for people with certain pre-existing conditions or those who take certain prescription medications, too much (or any amount of) garlic can cause more harm than good. In moderation among relatively healthy people, garlic delivers a good dose of B vitamins, manganese, phosphorus, iron and zinc. It has a wonderful taste, but it’s no wonder drug (sorry).

Can you give garlic to pets?

Please don’t. Though some “holistic” websites claim raw garlic is an effective way to prevent flea infestation in pets, the science shows any food from the allium family can be toxic to dogs and cats. For safety’s sake (and for the love of your fur babies), consult a licensed veterinarian.

What about the legends of garlic and vampires?

It is well-documented (c’mon, we’ve all seen the movies) that eating raw garlic provides protection against vampires and other evil forces. It is also a highly effective and diplomatic way to bring a bad first date to an immediate end. Or so I’m told.

Why does roasting garlic change its flavor?

Allicin, the organosulfuric compound that makes garlic “stinky,” becomes neutralized when it reaches 140° F and is converted to a different compound called polysulfides. The flavor shifts from “sharp” to “mellow” and even somewhat sweet. This conversion can be achieved during careful sautéing or frying, but more easily and consistently by slow roasting.

Can I roast garlic in the microwave?

Nope. It may soften a bit, but the texture and flavor will be all wrong, and the best you can hope for is a small mess in the microwave. And that lingering smell…phew. Don’t rush it.

How do you keep roasted garlic?

We go through it pretty fast at our house, so we usually just keep it wrapped in its roasting foil near the onion basket on the counter. If it will be several days or more before you plan to use it, I’d recommend transferring the roasted garlic to a covered container in the fridge.

Ready to make some? Gather up this very short list of ingredients, and let’s get started!

When we have a big cooking event approaching, I roast a bunch of garlic at once. We did 10 bulbs this day!

Ingredients

fresh whole bulbs of garlic

extra virgin olive oil (or spray)

aluminum foil

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 350° F.
  2. Peel away most of the dry “paper” layer that protects the garlic, leaving only the layer closest to the cloves. This assists with more even roasting, and minimal mess when you are ready to use the garlic.
  3. Use a sharp knife to carefully cut the top off the entire bulb of garlic. It’s best to lay the garlic on its side to do this. If the individual cloves are offset at different heights, you can use the tip of a paring knife to expose the shorter ones.
  4. Place the cloves (individually or two at a time) on a square of aluminum foil, and wrap the foil up the sides to create a bundle, but leave it open at the top. Drizzle or spray oil lightly over the exposed tops of the cloves.
  5. Close up the foil tightly and bake, either on a cookie sheet or in a skillet, for about an hour. The garlic doesn’t take up much space in the oven, so I usually do this while I’m also baking a roast, a casserole or a loaf of bread.

The color of roasted garlic may vary, depending on your oven temperature, the age of the garlic and the length of roasting time. Once it is soft and easily squeezed from the cloves, it’s done, even if it has a somewhat “blonde” color. We usually let it roast until it is a deep golden shade.

To use the roasted garlic, simply turn the bulb upside down and gently squeeze the sides. The soft cloves will slide right out into your bowl or recipe. Add roasted garlic to soups, dips, hummus, vegetables, spreads, sauces or meats, or enjoy it in its simplest form by spreading it right onto crackers or crostini.